Responsive Environments and Artifacts: DISAPPEARANCE - Casestudies

Please make sure that
1. You signup for a Casestudy presentation in the schedule table below.
2. You create a dedicated page for your research theme using the "Theme Template".
3. The dedicated page you create for your research theme is properly hyper-linked to research theme listed below.
4. You create a dedicated page for each of your case studies using the "Casestudy Template".
5. The dedicated page you create for each casestudy is properly hyper-linked to Casestudy Name listed under your Research Theme Page.

HERE IS ALL ACCOUNT INFORMATION:

1. Youtube Account:
To Upload your Videos:http://www.youtube.com/
Username:realtimecities@gmail.com
Password: gsdfall2011
2.Scribd Account:
To Upload your Powerpoint or PDF presentations:http://www.scribd.com/
Username:realtimecities
Password: gsdfall2011


Casestudy Presentation Signup Sheet:
Session01 (Wednesday, March 7th, 2012)
1 Jose Luis Garcia del Castillo jgarciad@gsd.harvard.edu
2 Stefano Andreani andreani@gsd.harvard.edu
Session02 (Wednesday, March 21st, 2012)
3 Timothy Sullivan tsulliva@gsd.harvard.edu
4 Matias Imbern mimbern@gsd.harvard.edu
Session03 (Wednesday, March 28th, 2012)
5Jutta Friedrichs jfriedri@gsd.harvard.edu
6 Woong Ki Sung noclew@mit.edu
Session04 (Wednesday, April 4th, 2012)
7 Catherine Winfield winfield@mit.edu
8 Ted Diehl tdiehl@gsd.harvard.edu
9 Christian Ervin cervin@gsd.harvard.edu
Session05 (Wednesday, April 11th, 2012)
10 Matthew Conway mconway@gsd.harvard.edu
11 Stephanie Saltzman saltzman@gsd.harvard.edu
12 Qi Su qsu@gsd.harvard.edu
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1. Terra Nullius byTimothy Sullivan tsulliva@gsd.harvard.edu

Research Theme's Short Abstract (250 words) :
Terra Nullius means Empty Land. It was the legal justification for colonial governments for claiming and annexing "un-inhabited lands". Countries that were claimed using include Australia New Zealand parts of Canada, and Greenland. This legal framework created longstanding issues for indigenous populations who were considered "nullius"disappeared. Being a disappeared people meant that for the Australian Aborigines! Which had living in what the british claimed as empty for at least 50,000 years, they had no rights, no protections, and we're for legally controlled by the flora and fauna act. I.e. they were legally considered not as people but as wildlife akin to the koala, or the kangaroo. This was only recently changed in the 1960's .
I want to investigate this concept of empty land, So I have chosen examples of artists(mostly) who engage in finding a parallell existence that exists whether it is codified, systemised by humanity or not.
01. Australia


02. Birndiwirndi - Worlds apart


03. 24hr Panorama


04. Years


05. 1945-1998


06. Atom Man


07. Chernobyl wildlife


08. Wastelands


09. Camera Trap


10. Panopticon


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2. The Beauty of Ephemeral by Matías Imbern, mimbern@gsd.harvard.edu

Research Theme's Short Abstract (250 words)

Philosophy/Motivation:
Ephemeral things are transitory, existing only briefly, for a short period of time.
The beauty of ephemeral is not a research about things that literally disappear; it is about things that are real, beautiful things waiting to be discovered, to be appreciated.
Is not the beauty what is ephemeral but the time that people dedicate to it.
All is about being aware...

Abstract:
These case studies are the result of an extensive research through the whole semester, looking for inspiration in different areas of interest. The six sub-categories finally chosen for the classification not only share disappearance as a core but also the beauty embedded in their delicate and ephemeral condition. One of the mayor concerns, while doing the investigation, was to provide a balance between architectural and installation examples. Indeed, this was used as a method for blurring the boundaries of these different scales of applicability, reinforcing the idea that beauty should affect constantly our contemporary life.
The main objective was to generate a feedback with the final project of the course. Is in the ephemeral condition of beauty where the final project is going to work, by making an attempt to send a subtle message enclosed that needs to be discovered about the importance of being aware of beautiful things in life.

Reflection:
01. 4 Beams
02. AIDS Memorial - Infinite Forest
03. Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2009
Lightness:
04. Balloon
05. Magic Table
06. KAIT Workshop
Light Effects:
07. Breaking the Edge
Chemical Reaction:
08. Bar 89
Blurry Boundaries:
09. UK Pavilion Expo Shanghai 2010
10. Museum of Art Glass Pavilion in Toledo
Subtle Movement:
11. Electronic Origami: Input/Output blintz folding
12. Animated Vines

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3. Architecture of Memory by Ted Diehl, tdiehl@gsd.harvard.edu
Research Theme's Short Abstract (250 words) :
Elias Canetti, a Bulgarian author, once stated "It is the sublime miracle of the human mind: memory." Indeed, more than any other creature, a human being's existence is largely determined by his memory. It is what makes us who we are. However, if memory can play such a major role in shaping the life and being of a person, can memory play a role in shaping the existence of a place, or a time? Do these have memory too? And if so, can a human being access it? How?
These are questions I seek to explore through the following case studies, showing examples of how space and architecture can capture memories. I have divided these examples into three categories: Memory belonging to a space, memory belonging to a moment, and memory belonging to a person.

link to PDF Print-Ready Format

MEMORY OF A SPACE
01. 9/11 Memorial
02. Hypercube
03. Eraser
04. Resounding Arches
05. All Those Vanished Engines
MEMORY OF A MOMENT
06. Ephemeral Memorials
07. Shifting Time
08. Footsteps Canon
09. Echo Evolution
MEMORY OF A PERSON
10. Vietnam Veterans Memorial
11. Ise Grand Shrine
12. The Memory Machine
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4. Dereliction by Jose Luis Garcia del Castillo, jgarciad@gsd.harvard.edu
Research Theme:
In architecture, as buildings are objects created by man, they are usually erected to be inhabited by man. It is in their full use and maintenance that architecture stands at its greatest splendor. Or at least, that is the most accepted convention. But, although architecture is meant to be lived, there are plenty of reasons that can break this relation: obsolescence, budget, comfort, disaster, fear... all of them making the building not apt for its purpose anymore, and hence leading to one of the most interesting states in architecture: dereliction. This research will go through a variety of case studies where the disappearance in architecture is manifested in the presence of time and the absence of humans.

01. Project Name02. Project Name03. Project Name
01. Assorted works, by Thomas Jorion
02. 'The world without us', by Alan Weismann + 'Life after people', by The History Channel
03. Assorted paintings, by Caspar David Friedrich
04. 'Bank of England' (London, UK), by Joseph Gandy
05. Tomb Raider series, by Eidos Interactive
06. Brion Cemetery (near Firenze, IT), by Carlo Scarpa
07. Convento do Carmo (Lisbon, PT) + Old Town of Belchite (Zaragoza, ES) + Jedburgh Abbey (Jedburgh, UK)
08. Ruinenberg (Postdam, DE), by Frederick the Great
09. Industrial Mining Legacy (Linares, ES)
10. Old Yugoslavian Republic monuments (various locations, YU), by Josip Tito
11. Michigan Theater (Detroit, US), by Rapp & Rapp

You might consider Tabitha Soren's Uprooted -Christian.
Thanks Christian, very interesting. Check Thomas Jorion's work, similar work - Jose Luis


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5. The dis-appearance of Technology and re-appearance of Nature by Stefano Andreani, andreani@gsd.harvard.edu

Research Theme's Short Abstract:

In the realm of contemporary responsive environments, technology is often an evident feature for the user that is involved in the spatial, sensorial, or interactive experience. Although essential for enabling its realization, technology is however perceived as a non-natural phenomenon, almost at the opposite extreme of what we generally refer to Nature. But what if technology, instead, hides itself for enhancing and making manifest certain characteristics of the natural world? This series of case studies demonstrates how technology can be used to promote, simulate, or recreate responsive natural phenomena that engage the user in such a way that the adopted techniques are almost not perceived anymore. This disappearance of technology then allows for the reappearance of nature at the eyes of the user, who is somehow detached from the role of technology in favor of an immersive experiences of natural – or hyper-natural – phenomenon.
01. Cloudscapes, by Transsolar + Tetsuo Kondo architects
02. Hylozoic Ground, by Philip Beesly and Rachel Armstrong
03. H.O.R.T.U.S., by ecoLogicStudio
04. Warped, by Matthew Hume
05. Interactive Curtain, by Hyperbody
06. Reef, by Rob Ley
07. Shoal, by Troika
08. Techno-Naturology, by Elain Ng yan Ling
09. Micro Synergetics, by Sascha Bohnenberger
10. Still Life, by Scott garner


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9. Entropy by Christian Ervin, cervin@gsd.harvard.edu
Research Theme's Short Abstract (250 words) :
In this set of case studies, I explore the topic of entropy, in three parts: Material Entropy, Entropy of the Self, and The Refusal of Entropy. Each part contains three projects. In Material Entropy, I present projects concerned with the decay of physical and digital material. Entropy of the Self consists of three projects on the erosion of identity, through mechanical degradation, geologic transformation, and collective aggregation. In The Refusal of Entropy, I explore the Western cultural tendency to control and refute the passage of time and its effects on our bodies and our environments. Taken as a whole, this series of case studies critiques the human obsession with permanence: as material entities subject to the asymmetric trajectory of time, we are always in the process of disappearing.

Introduction to the theme of Entropy
01. Chocolate Bunny by Lernert & Sander

Material Entropy
02. Disintegration Loops by William Basinski
03. Digital Decay by Claire L. Evans
04. Lossless by Rebecca Baron & Douglas Goodwin

( Mandala Destruction )

Entropy of the Self
05. I Am Sitting In A Room by Alvin Lucier
06. Eroded Man Series by Kim Keever
07. The Class of 1988 & The Class of 1967 by Jason Savalon

The Refusal of Entropy
08. Toshi Shibata
09. The Nazca Lines
10. Roundup Ready System by Monsanto

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9. Shadows by Catherine Winfield, winfield@mit.edu
Research Theme's Short Abstract (250 words) :
Shadows appear and disappear based on environmental light conditions. During their temporal existence shadows provide time and spatial information, they provide a sense of depth, define the geometry of our environment and can inform us about time of day, even seasonal changes. The ability to perceive ourselves and our surroundings is based on our shadows, when our shadows are mimicked or manipulated our ability to gather information from our surroundings disappears.


01. Shadowplay by Kyle McDonald
02. Augmented Shadow by Joon Y. Moon
03. Streams and Flows commissioned by Stavanger, DK
04. Shadow Bag by Scott Sona Snibbe
05. Curious Creatures by Jimmy McGilchrist
06. Shadowing by Pipo Tafel
07. Real Life is Rubbish by Tim Noble and Sue Webster
08. Body Movies by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer
09. Shadow 3 by Shilpa Gupta
10. Letterheads by Simurai


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9. Disappearance by Stephanie Saltzman, saltzman@gsd.harvard.edu
Research Theme's Short Abstract (250 words) :

01. Tape Recorders by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer
02. One Hundred and Eight by Nils Volker
03. Projection One by Andrew Payne and Eddy Man Kim
04. Grasp Pendulum by ART+COM
05. Glass Box by Jussi Angesleva
06. Body Scanner by Jussi Angesleva
07. Cityscape by Legoman and Mandril
08. Mecaniques Discursives by Legoman and Fred Penelle
09. What'll It Take by Graham Coxon and Ninian Doff
10. Burberry Fashion Show Beijing 2011
11. Air France Commercial by Michel Gondry

10. Designed Emergence by Suqi(Qi Su) qsu@gsd.harvard.edu
Research Theme's Short Abstract (250 words) :
It is not time || space. but time && space...
It is about transformation...
It is about interaction...
It is about design...

01.BLUR
02.Spidernethewood
03.Hybrid Muscle
04.Sound Architecture
05.A history of the sky
06.Winchester House
07.Sagrada Familia
08. Nature is the best designer
09. Touch Me
10. Starry Night https://vimeo.com/36466564

11. Object Play: Environment Object Scale by Matthew Conway, mconway@gsd.harvard.edu

Abstract:
Investigations surrounding responsive environments tend to revolve around kinetic environments which utilize mechatronics and or light within a large scale. However, there is a vast array of scales concerning responsive environments and sensory inputs or tangible objects which effect said responsive environments. This investigation, or series of case studies, intends to span responsive environments in many scales, however always resulting in a response within a user's environment. The investigation begins with a series of case studies, the first starting at the largest scale of object concerning a responsive environment and concluding with the most direct object concerning a responsive environment, with gradations of object scale in between. Through the series of case studies, one may begin to understand the unimportance of object scale in correlation with the scale of the response of the environment. The objects themselves move closer and closer to user autonomy as the scale shrinks, while still maintaining a responsive effect in the environment.

01. 8-Bit Invader by Pavel Novak
02. Bubbles by Material & Application
03. Dune 4.2 by Studio Roosegaarde
04. E-Static Shadows by Zane Berzina
05. Scenocosme by Gregory Lasserre & Anais met den Ancxt
06. Turntable Rider by Cogoo
07. Audio Cubes by Percussa
08. Wearable Absence by Barbara Layne
09. Intimacy 2.0 by Studio Roosegaarde
10. Performative Ecologies by Ruairi Glynn
In architecture, as buildings are objects created by man, they are usually erected to be inhabited by man. It is in their full use and maintenance that architecture stands at its greatest splendor. Or at least, that is the most accepted convention. But, although architecture is meant to be lived, there are plenty of reasons that can break this relation: obsolescence, budget, comfort, disaster, fear... all of them making the building not apt for its purpose anymore, and hence leading to one of the most interesting states in architecture: dereliction. In this paper we will examine a variety of case studies where the disappearance in architecture is manifested in the presence of time and the absence of humans.

The dis-appearance of Technology and re-appearance of Nate