Recent Changes

Monday, May 14

  1. page (In)visible beauty edited ... Project Analysis: ...........................................................................…
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    Project Analysis:
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    Responsive Environment FinalFINAL Submission
    Appendix:
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    {Responsive Environment Final C# Code.rar}
    {(In)visible beauty - Responsive Environment FINAL Submission.pdf}
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    5:20 pm
  2. page Final Submissions edited ... 2. Traces, Catherine Winfield (winfield@mit.edu), Theodore Diehl (tdiehl@gsd.harvard.edy), Tra…
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    2. Traces, Catherine Winfield (winfield@mit.edu), Theodore Diehl (tdiehl@gsd.harvard.edy), Traces Print-Ready Design
    3. Gradus Resonare, Matthew Conway (mconway@gsd.harvard.edu), Stephanie Saltzman (ssaltzman@gsd.harvard.edu), Gradus Resonare
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    Qi Su (qsu@gsd.harvard.edu), (In)visible beauty Print Ready(qsu@gsd.harvard.edu)
    5. Manifold Warp, by Jose Luis Garcia del Castillo (jgarciad@gsd.harvard.edu) & Stefano Andreani (andreani@gsd.harvard.edu)
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    5:17 pm
  3. page Final Submissions edited ... 3. Gradus Resonare, Matthew Conway (mconway@gsd.harvard.edu), Stephanie Saltzman (ssaltzman@gs…
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    3. Gradus Resonare, Matthew Conway (mconway@gsd.harvard.edu), Stephanie Saltzman (ssaltzman@gsd.harvard.edu), Gradus Resonare
    4.(In)visible beauty, Matías Imbern (mimbern@gsd.harvard.edu), Qi Su (qsu@gsd.harvard.edu), (In)visible beauty Print Ready
    5. Project Title, Student Name (Student Email), Student Name (Student Email), Hyperlink to the wikipage of casestudies
    6. Project Title, Student Name (Student Email), Student Name (Student Email), Hyperlink to the wikipage of casestudies
    Manifold Warp, by Jose Luis Garcia del Castillo (jgarciad@gsd.harvard.edu) & Stefano Andreani (andreani@gsd.harvard.edu)
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  4. page Manifold Warp edited Project Name: Manifold Warp ... del Castillo (jgarciad@gsd.harvard.edu) & Stefano Andreani…
    Project Name: Manifold Warp
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    del Castillo (jgarciad@gsd.harvard.edu) & Stefano Andreani (andreani@gsd.harvard.edu)
    Project Brief Description:
    Manifold Warp is an installation where time, space, user and matter collide into a single performative media as the tangible incarnation of a higher-dimensional manifold.
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  5. page Manifold Warp edited Project Name: Manifold Warp Project Credits: Jose Luis Garcia del Castillo & Stefano Andreani…
    Project Name: Manifold Warp
    Project Credits: Jose Luis Garcia del Castillo & Stefano Andreani
    Project Brief Description:
    Manifold Warp is an installation where time, space, user and matter collide into a single performative media as the tangible incarnation of a higher-dimensional manifold.
    The idea for Manifold Warp arises from an investigation of the dynamics of the body, and how these dynamics can be translated into meaningful experiences. Usually, human movements turn into affective gestures only when performers act in particular and well-studied ways – e.g., dancing or rhythmic gymnastics with ribbons. Instead, everyday gestures embed hidden meanings that, if properly translated, might create unexpected spatial, visual, and emotional results.
    MW explores one of these methods to generate meaningful experiences out of natural movements of people, by manipulating physical space, fictional representations, and time conception through a never-repetitive interaction process. In particular, MW allows to create a performative actions through the user’s body without preconceiving the action itself: natural gestures are in fact processed in such a way that even a banal movement acquires meaning, creates effects, and stimulates further action.
    In order for this mechanism to happen, the adopted principle takes inspiration from the well-know concept of self-image mirror, in which two parallel mirrors create the effect of an infinite series of reflections. In MW, this function is played by a camera and a projector, is processed by a sophisticated algorithm, and is altered by the user’s dynamics. Being at the same time protagonist and spectator, the user in fact engages with both camera and projector in a physical way, influences with his movements the digital world, but most of all affects the surrounding space and the perceived time not only to him/herself, but also to the spectators. The media performance is in fact only the – always updated – result of a deeper level of experiences, blending “the digital” and “the physical” in a subtle – though spectacular – way. In the very performative moments, each of the user’s gesture creates a series of overlapping wakes that, by flowing after these dynamics, give rise to fluid imprints projected into a canvas placed in between camera and projector. The user is in fact tracked, his movements are then processed and projected, and finally altered by the user himself.
    With MW, several levels of interaction occur:
    User / front canvas interaction, in which the user engages with his projected and manipulated shape.
    User / back canvas interaction, in which the user “erases” his residual traces.
    User / time interaction, in which the user manipulates the performance’s time delay.
    User / matter interaction, in which the user deforms the fabric and thus affect the projection.
    User / user interaction, in which multiple-user projections are mutually affected.
    In the overall range of experiences that a user can generate with MW, the theme of disappearance is a constant theme. In fact, not only gestures gradually disappear while the related wakes fade, but also the entire body itself can disappear. This is particularly true in certain light conditions, when a user stops moving, assisting to his projection fading away – and then eventually reappearing again when a new gesture is performed.
    MW is thus a generator of unexpected emotions, a tangible – yet sublime – media, a space and time manipulator, an interactive hyper-game, an interpreter of human dynamics, that aims to open up new ways of exploring the body and its relation to the physical and digital worlds for meaningful experiences.
    Project Most Representative Images:
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    {TEASER_02.png}
    Project Analysis:
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    Manifold Warp - Final presentation

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  6. file TEASER_02.png uploaded
  7. page Final Submissions edited ... 7. Ted Diehl (tdiehl@gsd.harvard.edu) Sousveillance: Inventing and Using Wearable Computing D…
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    7. Ted Diehl (tdiehl@gsd.harvard.edu)
    Sousveillance: Inventing and Using Wearable Computing Devices for Data Collection in Surveillance Environments
    8. Student Name (Student Email)Jose Luis Garcia del Castillo (jgarciad@gsd.harvard.edu) - The TitleArchitectural Relevance of the Article, Hyperlink to the wikipage of reading discussionGordon Pask
    9. Matthew Conway (mconway@gsd.harvard.edu), Forms of Time and of the Chronotope in the Novel
    10.Stephanie Saltzman (saltzman@gsd.harvard.edu), The Computer for the 21st Century
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    11. Ise Grand Shrine
    12. The Memory Machine
    6. Dereliction by Jose Luis Garcia del Castillo, jgarciad@gsd.harvard.edu
    Research Theme:
    In architecture, as buildings are objects created by man, they are usually erected to be inhabited by man. It is in their full use and maintenance that architecture stands at its greatest splendor. Or at least, that is the most accepted convention. But, although architecture is meant to be lived, there are plenty of reasons that can break this relation: obsolescence, budget, comfort, disaster, fear... all of them making the building not apt for its purpose anymore, and hence leading to one of the most interesting states in architecture: dereliction. This research will go through a variety of case studies where the disappearance in architecture is manifested in the presence of time and the absence of humans.
    01. Project Name02. Project Name03. Project Name
    01. Assorted works, by Thomas Jorion
    02. 'The world without us', by Alan Weismann + 'Life after people', by The History Channel
    03. Assorted paintings, by Caspar David Friedrich
    04. 'Bank of England' (London, UK), by Joseph Gandy
    05. Tomb Raider series, by Eidos Interactive
    06. Brion Cemetery (near Firenze, IT), by Carlo Scarpa
    07. Convento do Carmo (Lisbon, PT) + Old Town of Belchite (Zaragoza, ES) + Jedburgh Abbey (Jedburgh, UK)
    08. Ruinenberg (Postdam, DE), by Frederick the Great
    09. Industrial Mining Legacy (Linares, ES)
    10. Old Yugoslavian Republic monuments (various locations, YU), by Josip Tito
    11. Michigan Theater (Detroit, US), by Rapp & Rapp

    9. Christian Ervin (cervin@gsd.harvard.edu) Entropy [PDF]
    9-1. Chocolate Bunny by Lernert & Sander
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  8. page Casestudies edited ... 12. The Memory Machine ......................................................................…
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    12. The Memory Machine
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    4. __Dereliction__Dereliction by Jose
    Research Theme:
    In architecture, as buildings are objects created by man, they are usually erected to be inhabited by man. It is in their full use and maintenance that architecture stands at its greatest splendor. Or at least, that is the most accepted convention. But, although architecture is meant to be lived, there are plenty of reasons that can break this relation: obsolescence, budget, comfort, disaster, fear... all of them making the building not apt for its purpose anymore, and hence leading to one of the most interesting states in architecture: dereliction. This research will go through a variety of case studies where the disappearance in architecture is manifested in the presence of time and the absence of humans.
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    09. Industrial Mining Legacy (Linares, ES)
    10. Old Yugoslavian Republic monuments (various locations, YU), by Josip Tito
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    & Rapp
    You might consider Tabitha Soren's Uprooted -Christian.
    Thanks Christian, very interesting. Check Thomas Jorion's work, similar work - Jose Luis
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